Treaty Land Acknowledgement

Treaty 1 Territory and the Homeland of the Metis Nation: Winnipeg Regional Office

We take time to acknowledge and honour Treaty 1 Territory and the Peoples and the lands that makeup Turtle Island. Lands which are home to the Anishinabek, Inninewak, Anishininwag, Dakota, Lakota and Dene peoples who, prior to contact with Europeans, created and maintained important trade routes, belonged to the land and respected non-human species, and thrived in a culture that was celebrated through language, ceremony, tradition and a sustainable economy. Also important is the recognition that Treaty 1 Territory is the homeland of the Metis Nation; a nation that came to be in the late 18th, early 19th century. A nation of people of mixed Indigenous and European ancestry with its own distinct culture, language and history. As we gather in Treaty 1 Territory it is important to recognize and honour Treaty 3 Territory, in particular Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, the source of Winnipeg’s clean drinking water. To honour the gift of water, Career Trek recognizes that in September of 2021, community members were finally able to drink clean water from their taps, ending a 24-year boil water advisory. We further recognize the importance and impact of the all-weather road that opened in June 2019.  

Treaty 2 Territory: West Regional Office – Brandon, MB

Career Trek acknowledges, respects and has the honour of working on lands in Treaty 2 Territory, a treaty that was negotiated and entered into in 1871 at Manitoba House. It is important to recognize that the land on which we’re gathered is the home of the Dakota, Anishinabe, Inninewak , Anishininwag, Dene and Metis peoples. It is on these lands, that prior to European contact, Indigenous peoples established and maintained important trade routes, connected with and lived off the land, and thrived in a culture of language, ceremony, tradition and a sustainable livelihood. 

Treaty 5 Territory: North Regional Office – The Pas, MB

Career Trek acknowledges, respects and has the honour of working on lands in Treaty 5 Territory, a treaty that was first negotiated and entered into in 1875 in Berens River. Treaty 5 Territory is home to the Inninewak and Dene Peoples of the North who, prior to contact with Europeans, established and maintained important trade routes, connected with and lived off the land, and thrived in a culture that was celebrated through language, ceremony, tradition and a sustainable livelihood.

Today we are witness to the reawakening and revitalization of Indigenous languages, ceremony, tradition and connection to the land. This return to traditional ways of knowing is re-establishing the connection, place, livelihood and belonging for Indigenous Peoples who have inhabited Turtle Island since time immemorial.

As we think about and acknowledge Treaty 1, Treaty 2, Treaty 3, and Treaty 5 Territory, and the Homeland of the Métis Nation, and as we move along the path of reconciliation it will be important to remember that we are on a journey of reconciliation because of a history, that until recently, hadn’t been told – the true history, a dark history of Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples.

In the era of truth and reconciliation it will be important to ensure there is a dedicated commitment from individuals and institutions to the 94 Calls to Action outlined by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the 46 articles of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 231 Calls for Justice that came from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two-Spirit people.

Taken from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s principles of reconciliation:

“Together, Canadians must do more than just talk about reconciliation; we must learn how to practice reconciliation in our everyday lives – within ourselves and our families, and in our communities, governments, places of worship, schools, and workplaces. To do so constructively, Canadians must remain committed to the ongoing work of establishing and maintaining respectful relationships.” (Truth and Reconciliation (2015) Final Report. National Center for Truth and Reconciliation, University of Manitoba:Winnipeg,MB.P.16).